Middle Georgia parents aim to keep kids cool

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MACON, Georgia (41NBC/WMGT) – The dangers of heat exposure are real for everyone–especially children.

It may be a little hard to believe some people could leave a child in the backseat of a hot car.

But it happens more than you think.

Two children’s deaths were reported here in the state in the last week.

"I just don’t leave them in the car at all," said parent Tammy Moore.

Moore isn’t taking any chances with her children’s lives when it comes to the summer heat.

"I won’t drive my kids around in any vehicle that don’t have air conditioning," said Moore.

Dr. Cassandra Wilson warns against the dangers of dehydration and heat stroke–especially for kids.

She explains the brain works even more to cool the body down when it’s extremely hot.

"It’s completely overwhelmed and that’s when they start getting dizziness, lethargic," said Wilson.

And possibly worse–death.

"It’s especially dangerous for children and the elderly who may not be able to get out of whatever hot or extremely cold environment to get into a safe place," said Moore.

The recent death of an Atlanta child left in the back of a car sparked Governor Nathan Deal’s campaign, "Look Again".

It urges Georgians to look twice in the backseat to be sure a child isn’t locked in a hot car.

"If you ever see a child unattended, to call 911 immediately," said Wilson.

Moore has six kids–her key to keeping them cool? A lot of water.

"Outside playing we always have water–little kiddy pools or whatever," said Moore. "Lots of popsicles and lots of water and stuff like that. Keeps them cool. And I keep them wet. Soak down in the sunscreen of course."

Dr. Wilson adds limit outside activities between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., when the sun is at its peak.

Dress them in light-colored, loose-fitting clothes.

And if your child starts to show signs of dehydration or heat stroke, get them in a shady, cooler environment immediately and give them water.

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Sean Franklin joined the 41NBC news team in November of 2013. He’s originally from Marietta, Georgia. He graduated from Marietta High School in 2009 and loves returning home any chance he gets. Sean moved up to Knoxville, Tennessee after high school, where he graduated from the University of Tennessee in 2013 with a B.S. in Journalism and Electronic Media. While in college, he interned at WVLT-TV Local 8 News in Knoxville. He eventually moved to Assignment Desk Editor on the weekends. Sean loves hanging with friends and family, playing guitar and taking photos. Sean’s looking forward to telling stories about Middle Georgia. If you have any story ideas, feel free to get in touch! sfranklin@41NBC.com.