Georgia Gives Day helps Macon charities flourish

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MACON, Georgia (41NBC/WMGT) – “Click on the link that’s out there,” said VP For Development at NewTown Macon Erin Keller. “And hit donate now and you’re right there.”

It’s as easy as logging on and having the right heart.

“Everyone coming together and really looking over the charities in their community,” said Community Relations Coordinator at Jay’s HOPE Christie Johnson.

It’s Georgia Gives Day all day Thursday.

“We can not only tell our story, but we can also raise funds,” said Dianne Fuller, Executive Director at the Fuller Center For Housing.

GeorgiaGivesDay.org has a central list of charities around the state that you can give to all day, and Macon charities are excited.

Over at Newtown Macon,  Keller says it’s all about the projects.

“It’s just an opportunity for everyone to stop and imagine what their community might look like if we didn’t have the work of non-profits,” said Keller.

Newtown Macon aims to improve the community like adding furniture to parks downtown.

“Come out, have lunch downtown, go to a downtown restaurant, come out to the park and eat lunch with a friend,” said Keller.

Up the street at Jay’s HOPE, the focus for Community Relations Coordinator Christie Johnson and the rest of the staff is families with kids who are battling cancer.

“We are a small organization and we rely on the community for support, and so the fact that we are able to get highlighted on this one day is really awesome,” said Johnson.

Pictures of kids Jay’s HOPE has helped line the wall, and it happens because of donations.

“So some of the options are people can give ten dollars and that would help us put together a care package for a kid in the hospital, some people choose to give 25 and that helps buy gas cards to help kiddos get to and from treatment or they can choose to give 50 dollars and that would help pay for mortgages and utilities,” said Johnson.

And over at Taste ‘N See Coffee Shop on Poplar Street, Dianne Fuller and her staff at The Fuller Center for Housing monitors donations to help people rebuild their homes, and sometimes their lives.

“It’s people that their health might be affected because there’s water coming into their house,” said Fuller. “It may be dealing with mold or mildew and that’s just an unhealthy situation. So everyone we deal with is in true need.”

The need is deep, but the donations–and the hearts–are filling it in quickly.

Non-profit organizations across the state motivated more than 19-thousand people to open their hearts and donate more than $3.6 million, setting a new record.