IT shortages affecting workflow at Macon-Bibb County Courthouse

MACON, Georgia (41NBC/WMGT) - Many of us rely on technology, and that's no exception for government entities. With everything being electronic in the Macon-Bibb County court house, judges say it's crucial to have enough hands on deck for technological mishaps.

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MACON, Georgia (41NBC/WMGT) – Many of us rely on technology, and that’s no exception for government entities. Since everything is electronic in the Macon-Bibb County Courthouse, judges say it’s crucial to have enough hands on deck for technological mishaps.

Judges say there’s a major Information Technology (IT) shortage affecting courthouse employees’ jobs. Out of 26 IT positions available, only 17 are filled. Judges went before commissioners Tuesday to request more reliable WiFi and more IT help.

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Macon-Bibb commissioners and Mayor Robert Reichert expressed their frustrations about the problem during Tuesday’s committee meeting.

Judge Philip Raymond says the nine IT vacancies are causing delays and issues with court case filings, child support check distributions, marriage licenses, jury summons, and computer and software installations.

Raymond says last summer’s budget cuts and furloughs caused people to leave and find other jobs.



“Obviously this is a great time to look at it with the budget and to see where we need this is a perfect example of things we need to concentrate on,” Commissioner Valerie Wynn said.

The county’s hiring committee put a hiring freeze on filling the positions, but the hiring freeze was lifted two months ago, and all positions are posted.

“I do not like the idea that some of our employees that we have had left this job because they cannot receive the funding that they’re looking for, that they should be paid because we don’t have the money to pay them,” Commissioner Wynn said.

Commissioners are drafting a proposal to fill the vacancies and hire an IT contracting company to help the courthouse get back on track.

The draft proposal will be discussed at the next board meeting May 7.