Reflections on the anniversary of 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

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2020 March on Washington Anniversary
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WASHINGTON (AP/CNN/NBC) — Civil rights advocates have begun gathering to highlight the scourge of police and vigilante violence against Black Americans at a commemoration of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Thousands gathered at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, where the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his historic “I Have A Dream” address, a vision of racial equality that remains elusive for millions of Americans.

2020 March on Washington Anniversary

And turnout has been lighter than initially intended due to city-imposed coronavirus pandemic restrictions that limit out-of-state visitors to the nation’s capital.

Satellite march events have been planned in a handful of states, including South Carolina, Florida and Nevada.

The 57th anniversary of the March on Washington for jobs and freedom

Martin Luther King, Junior led hundreds of thousands to the national mall — demanding civil rights and economic equality for African-Americans.

It was here that King gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.

That 1963 speech shared King’s vision of an America without a deep racial divide.

An America where his children, and others who look like them, are judged on the content of their character, not the color of their skin.

Much like the current calls for civil action — the 1963 march called for an end to systemic racism, police violence against African-Americans, and fair voting practices.

1963 MARCH ON WASHINGTON FOR JOBS AND FREEDOM REFLECTIONS

PETER YARROW (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“Peter, Paul and Mary at the March on Washington”)

DAVID AUSPITZ (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“‘It Was Everybody, Together’”)

ALTON BROOKS (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“Inspired by the March on Washington”)

NANCY BROWN (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“A Moving Moment at the March on Washington”)

DURHAM CALDWELL (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“Media Coverage of the Civil Rights Movement”)

REV. WALTER CHALMERS (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“A Powerful Experience at the March on Washington”)

CHARLIE GETER (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“Broadcasting the March on Washington”)

QUENTIN LAWSON (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“The March: A Life-Changing Event”)

JULIE LIEDMAN (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“The March: A Big Awakening”)

JOAN LEE NELSON (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“A Teenager at the March on Washington”)

LORRAINE POWELL-JOHNSON (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“The Magnitude of the March on Washington”)

JAMES SCHALLER (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“Covering the March on Washington”)

REV. HORACE SHEFFIELD (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“A Witness to Planning the March on Washington”)

DARRYL WALKER (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“Setting the Blueprint for Protests That Followed”)

STANLEY WELCH (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“A Front-Row Seat at the March on Washington”)

DARNELL WILLIAMS (Interview below)
March on Washington Reflection (“A Product of the March on Washington”)

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Watch more than 17 hours of stories like these for free — the entire Voices of the Civil Rights Movement collection is available at CivRightsVoices.com.